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​Sculptural Artist Laurie Lea has created an impressive, large suspended glass fixture that explores the play between light and form in response to several passages of Scripture.​ Click "Read More" to view detail photos of her work. Read More

Sculptural Artist Laurie Lea has created an impressive, large suspended glass fixture that explores the play between light and form in response to several passages of Scripture.


Laurie Lea, Sacred Light (detail 1)



Laurie Lea, Sacred Light (detail 2)



Laurie Lea, Sacred Light (detail 3)



Laurie Lea, Sacred Light (detail 4)



Laurie Lea, Sacred Light (detail 5)



Laurie Lea, Sacred Light (detail 6)



Laurie Lea, Sacred Light (detail 7)



Laurie Lea, Sacred Light (detail 8)



Details
Year
2019
Medium
Sculpture
Dimensions
9’ x 15”
Materials
Glass, Resin, LED Lighting, Monofilament
Artist Curated by
Michael Markham
Video and Photos of Artwork by
Michael Markham

Scripture

Exodus 13:21

21 And the LORD went before them by day in a pillar of a cloud, to lead them the way; and by night in a pillar of fire, to give them light; to go by day and night:

Judges 7:20

20 And the three companies blew the trumpets, and brake the pitchers, and held the lamps in their left hands, and the trumpets in their right hands to blow withal: and they cried, The sword of the LORD , and of Gideon.

Psalms 104:2

2 Who coverest thyself with light as with a garment: who stretchest out the heavens like a curtain:

Isaiah 9:2

2 The people that walked in darkness have seen a great light: they that dwell in the land of the shadow of death, upon them hath the light shined.

Isaiah 30:26

26 Moreover the light of the moon shall be as the light of the sun, and the light of the sun shall be sevenfold, as the light of seven days, in the day that the LORD bindeth up the breach of his people, and healeth the stroke of their wound.

Isaiah 60:19–20

19 The sun shall be no more thy light by day; neither for brightness shall the moon give light unto thee: but the LORD shall be unto thee an everlasting light, and thy God thy glory. 20 Thy sun shall no more go down; neither shall thy moon withdraw itself: for the LORD shall be thine everlasting light, and the days of thy mourning shall be ended.

Isaiah 61:1

1 The Spirit of the Lord GOD is upon me; because the LORD hath anointed me to preach good tidings unto the meek; he hath sent me to bind up the brokenhearted, to proclaim liberty to the captives, and the opening of the prison to them that are bound;

Mark 14:3

3 ¶ And being in Bethany in the house of Simon the leper, as he sat at meat, there came a woman having an alabaster box of ointment of spikenard very precious; and she brake the box, and poured it on his head.

1 Corinthians 11:24

24 And when he had given thanks, he brake it , and said, Take, eat: this is my body, which is broken for you: this do in remembrance of me.

2 Corinthians 4:6–7

6 For God, who commanded the light to shine out of darkness, hath shined in our hearts, to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ.

7 But we have this treasure in earthen vessels, that the excellency of the power may be of God, and not of us.

Artist
Laurie Lea

Laurie Lea

From the Artist
For many years my sculpture has explored the relationship between light and form: how light affects form and form affects light, primarily in visual, psychological and symbolic ways. My forms originated with the single human form and slowly evolved over time into simple geometric shapes of circles, spheres and cylinders representing the human condition. The light comes from artificial sources and represents God and the invisible reality underlying appearance. The interaction of light and form gives me a way of examining human existence both in the physical dimension of observable phenomena and in the spiritual (invisible, intangible) dimension. Broken and translucent materials such as glass cover but do not obscure the light, referring to states of fragility, fragmentation, transformation, and redemption. [...] Read More

For many years my sculpture has explored the relationship between light and form: how light affects form and form affects light, primarily in visual, psychological and symbolic ways. My forms originated with the single human form and slowly evolved over time into simple geometric shapes of circles, spheres and cylinders representing the human condition. The light comes from artificial sources and represents God and the invisible reality underlying appearance. The interaction of light and form gives me a way of examining human existence both in the physical dimension of observable phenomena and in the spiritual (invisible, intangible) dimension. Broken and translucent materials such as glass cover but do not obscure the light, referring to states of fragility, fragmentation, transformation, and redemption.

SACRED LIGHT comprises a body of work consisting of long cylindrical transparent forms covered by broken glass and illuminated from within by white light (LED). Cast from tree forms, these forms are suspended by monofilament so that they slowly move and turn, casting reflections on walls, ceiling and surrounding space. The fusion of broken forms and light is a visual metaphor for hope and redemption. The theme of how our brokenness alliterates and even hides the light of the Father is found throughout the scriptures, even though it leaves with the hope of a light to be captured. From Gideon's pitchers breaking to reveal light, to Mary's alabaster box shattered as a memorial for Christ's death, to the very Eucharist itself, the broken bread and body of Christ, we stare at glimpses of the eternal light we were supposed to reflect. Jesus proclaimed Himself the "Light of the world." The gospel of John says “the Light shines in the darkness and the darkness cannot extinguish it;” Isaiah speaks of this Light shining in the darkness and His glory rising on us. Thus, this fusion of light and broken forms is meant to be a picture of Christ in us, the Hope of glory, in both our human frames and in this dark and broken world.

Biography
Laurie Lea is a New York-based visual artist exploring the integration of light and form (matter) through the media of sculpture, installation and poured works. Her interest in science and the nature of reality has guided her investigation of the intersection of the physical, visible dimension of observable phenomena with the invisible, intangible dimension of quantum physics. In addition to sculpture and poured works, she is creating light-forms to place on the coast of different countries where land meets water and day meets night. She is developing a language of light to express her ideas. [...] Read More

Laurie Lea is a New York-based visual artist exploring the integration of light and form (matter) through the media of sculpture, installation and poured works. Her interest in science and the nature of reality has guided her investigation of the intersection of the physical, visible dimension of observable phenomena with the invisible, intangible dimension of quantum physics. In addition to sculpture and poured works, she is creating light-forms to place on the coast of different countries where land meets water and day meets night. She is developing a language of light to express her ideas.

Lea has presented work in galleries, museums and alternative venues in the US and countries around the globe: Canada, Mexico, Sweden, Japan, Africa and Europe. She initiated and wrote the original Public Arts Ordinance for Atlanta, Ga when serving on the city's Fulton County Arts Council.

She is recipient of numerous awards, grants and residencies which include the Georgia Arts Council Purchase Award, grants from The Brooklyn Arts Council; Artists Grants/Artists Space; the New York Council on the Arts; Southern Arts, England and the Arts Council of Great Britain. During her time in England she was awarded a one-person exhibition and Artist Residency at the Russell-Cotes Art Gallery & Museum, Bournemouth, England. She also won a commission for a sculpture installation at the Walsall Museum & Art Gallery in Walsall, England. She was keynote speaker at the International Symposium of Art and Light at the University of the Creative Arts in Farnham, England. Recently, Lea has been awarded Artists Residencies in Greece and New York City. She has received the Gottlieb Foundation Individual Art Support Grant and was awarded the Professional Artist in Residency at the Pilchuck School of Glass near Seattle, WA.

She is a McDowell Colony Fellow and currently Artist in Residence at the YWCA Brooklyn, in Brooklyn, NY.

Sparks

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Emily Clare Zempel

Emily Clare Zempel

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